E-mail Scott
Scott's Links
About the Author
Opinion Archives
Social Media:
Facebook
Twitter
Tumblr
Google Plus
YouTube
Flickr
PhotoBucket
Monthly Archives:

January 2010
February 2010
March 2010
April 2010
May 2010
June 2010
July 2010
August 2010
September 2010
October 2010
November 2010
December 2010
January 2011
February 2011
March 2011
April 2011
May 2011
June 2011
July 2011
August 2011
September 2011
October 2011
November 2011
December 2011
January 2012
February 2012
March 2012
April 2012
May 2012
June 2012
July 2012
August 2012
September 2012
October 2012
November 2012
December 2012
January 2013
February 2013
March 2013
April 2013
May 2013
June 2013
July 2013
August 2013
September 2013
October 2013
November 2013
December 2013
January 2014
February 2014
March 2014
April 2014
May 2014
June 2014
July 2014
August 2014
September 2014
October 2014
November 2014
December 2014
January 2015
February 2015
March 2015
April 2015
May 2015
June 2015
July 2015
August 2015
September 2015
October 2015
November 2015
December 2015
January 2016
February 2016
March 2016
April 2016
May 2016
June 2016
July 2016
August 2016
September 2016
October 2016
November 2016
December 2016
January 2017
February 2017
March 2017
April 2017

Powered by Blogger
Subscribe via RSS

Monday, July 21, 2014

Students should care about local politics

Posted by Scott Tibbs at 4:00 AM (#)

Stephen Kroll declares in the Indiana Daily Student that "no one cares about local politics." He has a point. Local politics are not as "sexy" as national and state politics, and local government does not debate the kind of hot-button issues we find at the national level. Local government can pass resolutions about national or international issues, but local government in Indiana has no real power to influence those issues.

But I submit that students should care about local politics, because local government has a much more direct impact on your life (even as a student) than national or state government. The "Quiet Nights" program and the city of Bloomington's noise ordinance impacts students who can get cited for being too loud after a certain time.

Sexual assault on campus is a hot national issue and the subject of Congressional hearings, but where the rubber really meets the road is how local police and the prosecutor respond to sexual assault and how aggressively they pursue the cases - and how well they protect civil liberties of students accused of crimes.

Local government matters in fire protection, as we saw in 1999 when fire trucks arriving on the scene of the fatal Knightridge fire could not pump water. The reforms initiated to give firefighters the tools and personnel they need to do their job directly impacts students, especially now that there are more high-rise student apartment complexes than there were fifteen years ago.

Even township government can be important, as we saw in 2001 with a couple anthrax scares in Bloomington - including one in Wright Quad. The Bloomington Township Fire Department had the only hazmat team in Monroe County that could respond to an event like that.

Students living off-campus can file complaints about a bad landlord through city government's Housing and Neighborhood Development department. The city also handles trash collection, which is a basic service. It may sound funny to demean the office of county assessor, but having correct assessments is important. Correct assessments impact property tax bills, which are passed on to students in their rent.

If students are truly interested in politics and government policy, the place to start should be local government and local politics - especially since the impact of a single individual locally is much larger than it is statewide or nationally.

(0 Comments)

Note: All posts must be approved by the blog owner before they are visible on the blog.

Comments:

Post a Comment


Below are the rules for commenting on ConservaTibbs.com.

  1. A reasonable level of civility is expected. While it is expected that controversial political and social issues may generate heated debate, there are common-sense limits of civility that will be enforced.

  2. This blog is a family-friendly site. Therefore no cursing, profanity, vulgarity, obscenity, etc. will be allowed. This is a zero-tolerance rule and will result in automatic deletion of the offending post.

  3. Anonymity has greatly coarsened discourse on the Internet, so pseudonyms are discouraged but not forbidden. That said, any direct criticism of a person by name cannot be done anonymously. If you criticize someone, you have to subject yourself to the same level of scrutiny or the comment will be deleted.

  4. Please keep your comments relevant to the topic of the post.

  5. All moderation decisions are final. I may post an explanation or I may not, depending on the situation. If you have a question or a concern about a moderation decision, e-mail me privately rather than posting in the comments.

Thank you for your cooperation.