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Thursday, January 29, 2015

Not yielding to emergency vehicles is arrogant and heartless

Posted by Scott Tibbs at 4:00 AM (#)

Note: Since I moved the blog between a couple different hosting options, not all of the archives are on ConservaTibbs.com. Therefore, I will occasionally re-post things I wrote before 2010. This letter to the editor is from a little over ten years ago.

Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, January 7, 2005

To the editor:

I was visiting family over the weekend in Fort Wayne. While I was stopped at a red light, I heard a siren. The siren belonged to an ambulance, which approached the intersection as my light turned green.

Naturally, I did not move. After all, pulling out in front of an ambulance is not only dangerous, it is illegal. Most importantly, I would not slow down an emergency vehicle, because seconds can mean the difference between life and death. I heard the person waiting behind me honk his horn because I did not proceed through the green light. Apparently, getting to wherever he was going was more important than the life-saving mission the ambulance was on. This combination of arrogance and heartlessness saddens me.

I am not sure what this individual hoped to accomplish. Even if I had been arrogant and heartless enough to pull out in front of the ambulance, there was not enough room for him to get out.

To those drivers who think their time is too important to yield to an emergency vehicle, I challenge you to answer the following questions.

What if the ambulance you delayed was carrying a loved one? What if the delay you caused resulted in the death of that loved one? Could you live with yourself knowing that you killed someone you love? What if the few seconds you delay a fire engine is just enough to prevent them from saving your home as it burns? What if you are seriously hurt because you are hit by the fire engine to which you refused to yield the right of way?

Is it really worth it?

(2 Comments)

Note: All posts must be approved by the blog owner before they are visible on the blog.

Comments:

At January 30, 2015 at 10:58 AM , Blogger Eric Wilson said...  

Could be that he didn't hear the siren. It happened to me once. Pulled out, and was hit by the ambulance. (And cited of course.)


At January 30, 2015 at 2:46 PM , Blogger Scott Tibbs said...  

It is possible.

It is also highly unlikely.


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