E-mail Scott
Scott's Links
About the Author
Opinion Archives
Social Media:
Facebook
Twitter
Tumblr
Google Plus
YouTube
Flickr
PhotoBucket
Monthly Archives:

January 2010
February 2010
March 2010
April 2010
May 2010
June 2010
July 2010
August 2010
September 2010
October 2010
November 2010
December 2010
January 2011
February 2011
March 2011
April 2011
May 2011
June 2011
July 2011
August 2011
September 2011
October 2011
November 2011
December 2011
January 2012
February 2012
March 2012
April 2012
May 2012
June 2012
July 2012
August 2012
September 2012
October 2012
November 2012
December 2012
January 2013
February 2013
March 2013
April 2013
May 2013
June 2013
July 2013
August 2013
September 2013
October 2013
November 2013
December 2013
January 2014
February 2014
March 2014
April 2014
May 2014
June 2014
July 2014
August 2014
September 2014
October 2014
November 2014
December 2014
January 2015
February 2015
March 2015
April 2015
May 2015
June 2015
July 2015
August 2015
September 2015
October 2015
November 2015
December 2015
January 2016
February 2016
March 2016
April 2016
May 2016
June 2016
July 2016
August 2016
September 2016
October 2016
November 2016
December 2016
January 2017
February 2017
March 2017
April 2017
May 2017
June 2017

Powered by Blogger
Subscribe via RSS

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Another step toward a police state?

Posted by Scott Tibbs at 4:00 AM (#)

Note: I originally wrote this in 2009, but I am re-posting it because this terrible law is being considered again.

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Senate Bills 237 and 24 - moving toward a police state?
Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2009 07:42:28 -0500
From: Scott Tibbs <tibbs1973@yahoo.com>
To: H60@IN.gov, H61@IN.gov, H65@IN.gov, S44@IN.gov, S40@IN.gov

Representatives Welch, Pierce and Koch, and Senators Steele and Simpson,

I am writing to express my concern about and opposition to two pieces of legislation currently before the Indiana State Senate. Senate Bill 237 would require "all persons arrested after June 30, 2009, to submit a DNA sample." Senate Bill 24 would require "all persons arrested for a felony after June 30, 2009, to submit a DNA sample."

I have deep concerns about the government collecting and maintaining a DNA database for people arrested for a crime. If SB 237 and SB 24 only dealt with people convicted of a crime, it would be enough of a concern, though I can see the usefulness of keeping this kind of data on some criminals, especially convicted sex offenders. This would be a worthwhile discussion if that were the case, though there would still be concerns. But why should someone arrested for a crime that he/she may or may not have committed be required to submit a DNA sample?

SB 24 "provides for the expungement of a DNA sample" if the person arrested is acquitted, if the conviction is reversed, or if the case is dismissed. So why not require a DNA sample upon conviction of a crime instead? Why should everyone arrested for a felony be subject to DNA profiling when the data will only be kept on those convicted? In these lean economic times, why should government be spending money to collect and then dispose of DNA samples from people who are arrested but not convicted?

DNA evidence can be very useful for the criminal justice system, leading to the conviction of those responsible for crimes but also leading to the exoneration of people who have committed no crime. My concern is that legislation like this moves Indiana a little bit closer to being a police state, something that is anathema to a system of government founded on individual liberty and limitations on government power. I urge you to vote "no" on SB 237 and SB 24, and to do whatever you can to prevent them from becoming law.


Below are the rules for commenting on ConservaTibbs.com.

  1. A reasonable level of civility is expected. While it is expected that controversial political and social issues may generate heated debate, there are common-sense limits of civility that will be enforced.

  2. This blog is a family-friendly site. Therefore no cursing, profanity, vulgarity, obscenity, etc. will be allowed. This is a zero-tolerance rule and will result in automatic deletion of the offending post.

  3. Anonymity has greatly coarsened discourse on the Internet, so pseudonyms are discouraged but not forbidden. That said, any direct criticism of a person by name may not be done anonymously. If you criticize someone, you must subject yourself to the same level of scrutiny or the comment will be deleted.

  4. You must put a name or pseudonym on your comments. All comments by "Anonymous" will be deleted.

  5. Please keep your comments relevant to the topic of the post.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Comments: